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i 



TX 428.21 .A75B 

Arnold Sarah Louise. 

With pencil and pen : language lessons f 

St a n f o rd U n i versity U brarie s 
3 6105 04920 S811 



r LANGUAGE BOOK 



WITH PENCIL 
AND PEN 




428.ZI 
A"I5 8 





riJL^_.^^^:'^A^ 



iiiiiy^MMHMtJ^^w 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 
LIBRARY 



TEXTBOOK 
COLLECTION 




STANFORD V^p/ UNIVERSITY 
LIBRARIES 



WITH PENCIL AND PEN 



LANGUAGE LESSONS 

FOR 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS 

BY 
SAEAH LOUISE AENOLD 

formerly 
Supervisor of Primary Schools, Minnrapolib 

AND 

Supervisor of Schools, Boston 



GINN & COMPANY 

BOSTON • NEW YORK • CHICAGO • LONDON 



Copyright, 1906 
By SARAH 1.. ARNOLD 



ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 
67 8 



\0'V^'2>A- 



GINN & COMPANY • PRO- 
PRIETORS . BOSTON • U.S-A. 



PREFACE 

These lessons are sent forth with the hope that they may 
help the children who are learning in our primary schools 
to put their thoughts into writing. Their task is hard 
enough at best, and there is room for all the help which 
we can give. K the children like the book, the author will 
feel that her pen has been happily employed. 

The exercises have been read and tested by Miss Louise 
Robinson of the Boston primary schools, whose successful 
experience has made her assistance most valuable. 





"The moon afloat is the bonny boat" 



WITH PENCIL AND PEN 

LESSON 1 
ONE, TWO, THREE 

Jh/ey u^idZey teM to ryvo. 

Copy the verses. 

Bonny means pretty and good. 



LESSON 2 • 

Draw a picture of the moon. 

Draw a picture of a boat. 

Are they alike? 

What is the color of the sky sea? 

What is the color of the true sea? 

Where does the moon sail? 

Where does the boat sail? 



LESSON 3 
AN OLD, OLD RIDDLE 



\.i 



Copy the riddle and 
draw the picture of the 
candle. 




LESSON 4 
For Talking or Writing 




If you have ever seen a blacksmith, tell 

1. What he does. 

2. How he does it. 

3. What he works with. 

Tell all you can about the blacksmith's shop. 



LESSON 5 



Write five sentences telling five things that 
you can do. 



LESSON 6 




Draw the apples. 

Tell what apples are good for. 

LESSON 7 

Write the names of ten children whom you 
know. 

Begin each name with a capital letter. 



LESSON 8 

Write the names of six places of which you 
have heard. 

Begin each name with a capital letter. 



LESSON 9 




Draw this tent 

LESSON 10 

Make a tent 
out of paper 
or cloth. 

LESSON 11 
For Talking 

1. What are tents good for? 

2. Soldiers use tents; what for? 

3. Gypsies use tents; what for? 

4. People who camp in the woods in vaca- 
tion make tents; what for? 

5. Sometimes sick people are put into 
tents; what for? 

6. When is a tent better than a house? 

7. In what countries do you think people 
might live in tents? 

8. Indians used to live in tents. What 
were their tents called? 



( 



10 



LESSON 12 
For Talking and Writing 




A Tent Home 

These people live in Africa. The picture 
shows you how their home looks. The tents are 
shaped like the mountains. You might think 
that the mountains themselves are great tents. 

The tent home can be moved from place to place. 
This family moves often. How would you like to 
live in different places and carry your house with 
you? 

Tell in writing all that you learn from the 
picture. 



LESSON 13 11 

J9o-woiycL cu^ euro afiJiJ^, 

CcUmy't pMyil it iljly. 

Copy the riddle. Can you guess it? 




LESSON 14 



For Writing and Talking 
Copy these sentences: 

J? tAx^iynA nAX>44y. 

When do you think you should use these 
sentences ? 



12 



LESSON 15 




Copy the jingle: 

There was a crooked man, 

Who walked a crooked mile, 
And found a crooked sixpence 

Against a crooked stile. 
He bought a crooked cat. 

That caught a crooked mouse. 
And they all lived together 

In a little crooked house. 

LESSON 16 

Draw a picture which the '* crooked rhyme'' 
makes you think of. Perhaps you will draw the 
crooked cat or the crooked mouse. 




^^- 




LESSON 17 

Copy this picture 
of a stile; then try to 
tell in writing what 
a stile is good for. 



LESSON 18 



13 




Copy this verse and learn it by heart: 

THE BLUEBIRD 

Dear little blossoms down under the snow, 
You must be weary of winter, I know. 

Hark while I sing you a message of cheer! 
Summer is coming, and springtime is here! 



LESSON 19 

weary message 

These are hard words. Copy them ten times. 
See if you can use them in your own sentences. 



14 



LESSON 20 




Copy this nonsense rhyme : 

"lA/nitAAy it uiiro 



LESSON 21 15 

This lesson was written in school by a boy 
who tried to tell two things that he had seen 
the day before. The boy's name is Carl. He is 
in the third grade. 

CLpyUl 21. /qo6. 

Copy the lesson. 

Tell two things that you saw or heard yesterday. 

LESSON 22 

Write answers to these questions: 

1. What is the desk made of? 

2. What are you writing with? 

3. What game do you like to play? 

4. What will you do after school? 

5. What will you do next Saturday? 



LESSON 23 




Young Kittens 



16 



LESSON 23 — Continued 17 

Tell the story of this little girl: 

What is her name? 

Where is she? 

What is she doing? 

What is the mother cat doing? 

What are the kittens doing? 

What is the mother cat afraid of? 

Do you think the cat would carry her kit- 
tens as the little girl does? 

How would she carry them? 

Tell something else that you see in the 
picture. 

LESSON 24 

Copy this verse: 

For want of a nail the shoe was lost; 
For want of a shoe the horse was lost; 
For want of a horse the rider was lost; 
For want of a rider the battle was lost; 
For loss of the battle the country was lost, — 
And all for the want of a twopenny nail. 



18. 



LESSON 25 
For Talking 



Tell how you think the rhyme in Lesson 24 can 
be true. See if you can make a story about it. 

LESSON 26 
For Writing 

What can a cat do that you cannot do ? 
What can you do that a cat cannot do? 

LESSON 27 

Draw a watch showing that it is three o'clock. 




LESSON 28 

Write your name ten times. 



LESSON 29 

Draw the picture and copy the riddle 



19 




_-' i 






a J9ixidley 






20 



LESSON 30 








^h^vaO^-^ 



Copy the verse: 



3a4Ay oA^ Oy 6Za/iy wJicm^ onim^ o-ruey 
J?d- ^yfiiru/nyOy Iriy tA^y ^Anjy. 



LESSON 31 



Draw the violets in LessOn 30, and write a 
sentence about them. 



LESSON 32 21 

Copy this nonsense rhyme : 

The man in the wilderness asked of me 
How many strawberries grew in the sea; 
I answered him as I thought good, 
As many as red herrings grew in the wood. 

LESSON 33 
For Writing 

hard harder 

soft softer 

strong stronger 

heavy heavier 

good better 

fine finer 

sweet sweeter 

bright brighter 

Use these words in sentences, like this pattern: 
My ball is hard, but a stone is harder. 



22 



LESSON 34 




THE RAINBOW 

Here is an old weather verse; copy it, and 
learn it by heart. 

J9cLi/nS-(Mi^ at niaJit, 
jJcUZoAy'dy d^eyilaJit. 



LESSON 35 23 

Copy the verse and learn it by heart: 

Al oM uMAAy Uzlnny curiydy roeyi>-eA^ 

LESSON 36 
For Talking 

Have you ever seen a rainbow? When? 
Where? What was its color? its shape? When 
do you look for a rainbow? Why? 

What do you think the verse means? What 
do you think ''span'' means? 

These are the colors of the rainbow: violet, 
blue, green, yellow, orange, red. 

Learn to repeat the names in order. 



24 



LESSON 37 




Tovvser is a big black dog. He is just as old 
as Edith May — three years old. But he takes 
care of Edith. Once she went to pick daisies 
in the field. Every daisy seemed prettier than 
the last. She went farther and farther. At 
last she was so tired that she fell asleep under 
a tree. Towser stayed beside her until she 
awoke, then he showed her the way home. 

Read the story of Towser ; then shut your book 
and tell it as well as you can. 



LESSON 38 

Write a short true story about a dog. 



LESSON 39 



26 




Draw the picture 



LESSON 40 
For Talking or Writing 

1. Have you ever seen a rabbit? 

2. Where did you see it? 

3. What was it doing? 

4. Where do rabbits live ? 

5. What do they eat? 

6. Tell what the rabbit can do. 



N^^l 



LESSON 41 

What would you wish for if you had three 
wishes ? 

Write the answer in sentences, this way: 

First, I should wish — 



26 



LESSON 42 




STOP, STOP, PRETTY WATER 

^' Stop, stop, pretty water ! '' 
Said Mary one day. 

To a frolicsome brook 

That was running away. 

*^ You run on so fast! 

I wish you would stay; 
My boat and my flowers 

You will carry away. 



LESSON A2— Continued 27 

"But I will run after; 

Mother says that I may; 
For I would know where 

You are running away." 

So Mary ran on, 

But I have heard say 
That she never could find 

Where the brook ran away. 

Learn the poem by heart. A good way to 
learn it is to read a verse, and then shut your 
book and say it. Perhaps you will read it aloud 
first in the class. 

LESSON 43 

Copy all the words that rhyme in Lesson 42. 
See if you can think of other words that rhyme 
with day. Write them in a list. Then make a 
list of words that rhyme with brook ; with boat ; 
with Jind. 



28 



LESSON 44 
For Talking and Writing 




Draw the balloon, a^d tell all you can about it. 

1. What is it used for ? 

2. What is it made of ? 

3. Why does it rise and float in the air? 

4. What have you seen, that is like a bal- 
loon? 

LESSON 45 

Write a little story about a toy balloon. 



LESSON 46 



29 




The Eskimos live in a very cold country. 
Their houses are built of ice. Their clothes are 
made from the skins of animals. They use sleds 
instead of wagons, and dogs instead of horses. 

Would you like to live in the Eskimo country ? 

Tell all you can see in the picture. 



LESSON 47 

Draw a picture of the Eskimo house and 
write about it. 



30 



LESSON 48 



Tell how Santa Glaus would look, if you were 
to see him. Answer these questions: 

1. Is he tall or short? 

2. Is he stout or thin? 

3. Is he young or old? 

4. Describe his face. 

5. How is he dressed? 

6. What is he doing? 

7. What does he say? 




LESSON 49 



Write a note to Santa Claus, asking him to 
bring a sled like this to your little brother. 
Draw a picture of the sled. 




LESSON 50 



31 




curiycL nriAy. 

Copy the verse. 



A pool is still water collected in a hollow 
place. Pools are small ; ponds are larger ; lakes 
are larger yet. " Lea " means " meadow." 



32 



XiESSON 51 




COUNTING BABY'S TOES 

Dear little bare feet, 

Dimpled and white, 
In your long nightgown 

Wrapped for the night, 
Come, let me count all 

Your queer little toes, 
Pink as the heart 

Of a shell or a rose. 



LESSON 51 — Continued 33 

One is a lady 

That sits in the sun; 
Two is a baby, 

And three is a nun; 
Four is a lily 

With innocent breast; 
And five is a birdie 

Asleep in her nest. 

Eead the verses, and learn them by heart. 

LESSON 52 

Copy the sentences, and fill the blanks : 

1. Baby's feet are and white. 

2. They are wrapped in the long . 

3. Let me count the little . 

4. They are pink as 



LESSON 53 

Copy the second stanza of the poem. 




The Two Families 



34 



LESSON 54 35 

Write about the picture on page 34: 

1. What is the name of the picture? 

2. Tell about the room and its furniture. 

3. Tell about the mother and her lit- 
tle girl. 

4. Tell about the hen and her chicks. 

5. What do you suppose the artist wanted 
us to see in the picture ? 

LESSON 55 
For Practice in Spelling 

Select any one of the words in these lists, 
make five words to rhyme with it, and use each 
word in a sentence. 



bake 


bread 


chip 


hard 


sand 


black 


song 


tin 


lark 


sell 


eat 


tick 


late 


white 


gun 


will 



36 



LESSON 56 




THE LITTLE MAIDEN AND THE LITTLE BIRD 

'' Little bird ! little bird ! who '11 guide thee 
Over the hills and over the sea ? 
Foolish one ! come in the house to stay, 
For I 'm very sure you '11 lose your way." 

'^Ah, no, little maiden! God guides me 
Over the hills and over the sea ; 
I will be free as the rushing air, 
And sing of sunshine everywhere." 



Draw the bird and copy the verses. 



LESSON 57 37 

Learn the verses on page 36, so that two chil- 
dren can be chosen to recite them. One can be 
the little girl and one can be the bird. 

LESSON 58 

What are these things good for? 

1. A lamp. 5. A broom. 

2. A basket. 6. A mirror. 

3. A chair. 7. An apple. 

4. A coat. 8. A tree. 

Write a sentence for every answer, like this : 
A lamp gives light. 

LESSON 59 

Where have you seen these things ? 

1. A carriage. 5. A plow. 

2. A star. 6. A bell. 

3. A fish. 7. An engine. 

4. A mill. 8. An ax. 

Write a sentence for every answer. 



38 



LESSON 60 




Write all that you can about the picture. 



LESSON 61 39 

Copy the rhyme : 

For every evil under the sun 
There is a remedy, or there is none ; 
If there be one, try and find it ; 
If there be none, never mind it. 

LESSON 62 

There are two things you should never cry 
about, — the thing you can help, and the thing 
you can't help. 

There is an old proverb which says : 

'* There is no use in crying over spilt milk.'' 
Tell in writing why this is true. 

LESSON 63 

Can you tell a story about some one who cried 
about something that could be helped? Or, if 
you choose, tell about a boy who cried about 
something that could not be helped. 



\ 




An Indian Mother and Child 



40 



LESSON 64 41 

For Talking 

1. Tell all that you see in the picture. 

2. Where do Indians live? 

3. What do you know about them? 

4. Tell an Indian story that you know. 



LESSON 65 
For Writing 





These are old Indian arrowheads that were 
found in a field. They were made years ago 
of stone. Indians were very skillful in the use 
of the bow and arrow. 

Can you guess how the arrows were made ? 

Draw the arrowheads and write a sentence 
about them. 



42 LESSON 66 

jJi^Aypy, &<iAnAy, ^Zeyeyhy! 

OyyvcL cLaw-ri' clAyoAiA' cu lUti^ 

jJi^A/hy. &<zAnAy, dXoeJv. 
jJle^Jv, 3-aAnAy. 6X^yeAiy. 

JA^ iitt£t^ (JxiAA^ oAAy tAAy iaytn£^. 

J? aA4AAA^, 

jJioeAiy, S-aAyy, dA^^z^. 



LESSON QQ — Continued 



43 




The song on page 42 was written for German 
children in their language. It was so much liked 
that it was written again in English. '' Thy '' 
means ''your''; ''thee'' means "you." These 
words are often used in poetry. 

The baby's mother is singing him to sleep. 
The father is a shepherd. What does a shepherd 
do ? What is a shepherdess ? 



LESSON 67 

Copy the verses and learn them by heart. 
Tell all that you see in the picture. 



44 LESSON 68 

Here is a language lesson which was written by 
a boy in the third grade to tell what was happen- 
ing out of doors. The boy's name is James. 

TTicun^ 7, JCjOb. 

I think this must have been written on a 
windy day. Another boy, named Chester, wrote 
this lesson : 

jvut h/eAy a/oeyeyriy <>aAyhyct cLoM^^tv. 

You may copy these lessons. 



LESSON 68 — Continued 45 

This lesson was written by a girl named Bessie : 

1?U^ Jh, /qo6. 

fbit^ a/uo nx>Z U/hey ^a^. Jh^^nM 
Iwl. JAyeyw AyOy^iMy Oy lui^oA^yiyyit 



See if you can write 
two sentences, telling 
what is happening out 
of doors and how the 
sky and the fields look. 




\ 



46 LESSON 69 

Write about the picture on page 47. You may 
write a story about the picture, or you may tell 
what you see in it. 



LESSON 70 

Here is another slumber song or lullaby: 

THE NESTING HOUR 
Robin-Friend has gone to bed, 
Little wing to hide his head. 
Mother's bird must slumber too. 
Just as baby robins do. 
When the stars begin to rise 
Birds and babies close their eyes. 

Copy the verse, then learn it by heart. 

LESSON 71 

Find six words that rhyme with "fed," and 
use each word in a sentence. 




47 



48 



LESSON 72 




Dmw the picture and tell in writing what 
you know about frogs. 





LESSON 73 




bed 


hide 


rose 


star 


red 


side 


nose 


far 


fed 


ride 


head 


wing 


led 


wide 


lead 


sing 



Copy the lists of words that rhyme. 

Can you make a rhyme with any of them? 



LESSON 74 



49 




Farmer Jones built a fence around his corn- 
field to keep the cows out of his corn. He built 
one around his pasture to keep the colts from 
running away. So you see fences are used to 
keep things out and to keep things in. 



Write answers to these questions : 

1. What are fences made of? 

2. Where have you seen them? 

3. What kinds of fences have you seen ? 

4. Draw a picture of a picket fence. 

5. Draw a picture of a wire fence. 

6. Draw a picture of a stone wall. 



50 



LESSON 75 
For Copying 




George Washington was the first President of 
the United States. He is called the Father of 
his Country. 

This was said of Washington: 

'' First in war, first in peace, and first in 
the hearts of his countrymen.'' 



LESSON 76 
For Talking and Writing 



51 



,1 






'1 


Kr D^^^'^^^^i 


^rrfP^^F TH 




*-4 


3u 

m 


ta^' 



Mount Vernon 

This is a picture of Washington's home at 
Mount Vernon, Virginia. The house sits on a 
hill which slopes down to the Potomac River. 
It is surrounded by beautiful old trees. 

Perhaps you will visit Mount Vernon by and 
by, and see more than the picture tells you. 

Write all you can about the house, so that 
you can describe it plainly to your friends when 
you go home from school. 



52 LESSON 77 

For Writing 

I know a little girl whose name is Ruth. Her 
father is a sailor. I know a boy named Jack. 
His father is a carpenter. 

Now tell in writing: 

1. What does a carpenter do? 

2. What does a sailor do? 

3. What does a farmer do? 

4. What does a printer do? 

5. What does a tailor do? 

LESSON 78 




The sea gull loves to follow ships that go 
out to sea. His wings are strong and he can 
fly fast and far. 

Draw the picture and tell in writing what the 
sea gull can see as he flies. 



LESSON 79 53 

Write answers to these questions : 

1. What is your name ? 

2. How old are you ? 

3. Where do you live ? 

4. What do you like to play ? 

5. What work can you do ? 

LESSON 80 

Copy this lesson : 

iAMytA. JA^eyuy oA^ jjuynnydyoxuy, 
jJatuA/d^ayuy. 

LESSON 81 

Draw a picture of something in the schoolroom, 
and write about it. Tell what it is, what it is 
made of, and what it is good for. 




The Sick Monkey 
6^ 



LESSON 82 55 

For Writing 

You have seen the cat family and the hen 
family. On page 54 you find a picture of an- 
other family. Tell what you see in the picture. 

LESSON 83 
For Writing 

1. Where have you seen a monkey? 

2. Tell what it was doing. 

3. Tell how it looked. 

4. What can monkeys do that you can- 
not do? 

LESSON 84 
For Talking 

Tell a little story about a monkey that belonged 
to an organ grinder. 

1. Tell where the organ grinder took the 
monkey. 

2. Tell what the monkey did. 



\ 



56 LESSON 85 

For Talking 

Where have you seen ice? When have you 
seen it ? What makes ice ? What is it good for ? 

Suppose your friend who came from a warm 
country has never seen ice. How would you 
describe it to him? 

How does it happen that we have ice in 
summer? How is it obtained? How is it 
stored? If you have ever seen an ice-house, 
tell about it. 

What is a refrigerator? 

If a piece of ice is put in a pail of water, 
will it float or sink? What would happen if 
the ice in the ponds and rivers were to sink 
to the bottom as fast as it froze? 

People sometimes speak of the ice harvest. 
What do they mean? When does the ice har- 
vest come? 

Some children live in ice-houses. What 
children are they? 



LESSON 86 



57 




Here are men cutting ice, which is to be 
packed away in the ice-house, to be used in 
the hot summer. 

Tell all you see in the picture. 



LESSON 87 
For Writing 

Ask five questions about ice, and write the 
questions. After every question place the ques- 
tion mark (?). 



i 
1 



58 



LESSON 88 
For Talking 





Tell all that you see in this picture. 

Ask questions about it for others to answer. 



LESSON 89 
For Talking and Writing 

1. Where are the birds in winter? 

2. Where are the flowers ? 

3. Where are the leaves ? 

4. What is the field covered with ? 

5. What is the covering of the pond? 

6. How do animals keep warm in winter? 

7. How do you keep warm ? 



LESSON 90 59 

Copy the verse and learn it by heart: 

^AeycLcUXA, 
Si'tyiy tA^ Icumd- Oy iiooocy A^ 

(AMma^ tAey inAycL Oy oo-at t^ 

loaXAeA^ 
Jo fiAx>Z€Xit it iAyO-nriy tAey 

u^-tycUAeAy, 
(MynMA^ th^ <>fu£d/iyeyriy A^^^myiy OMydy 



60 LESSON 91 

For Writing 
THE WEATHER 

Write all you can about the weather as it 

is to-day. 

1. Is the weather warm or cold? 

2. Is it cloudy or clear? 

3. Is it sunny or hazy? 

4. Is it windy or quiet? 

5. What flowers are to be found now? 

6. How do the trees look? 

7. What do you notice about the roads? 

8. What is the month in which you 
are writing? 

9. What is the season? 
10. What is the place? 

Perhaps you can exchange your exercise with 
some other child in another part of the country. 

When it is cold in Maine it is warm in Florida. 
When Vermont has ice and snow California is a 
garden of flowers. 



LESSON 92 61 

For Writing 

Write as plainly as you can the differences 
between winter and summer. Tell what you 
can do in winter that you cannot do in summer, 
and why. 

LESSON 93 

For Talking or Writing 

Describe a game that you play in winter. 

1. Tell how many play the game. 

2. Tell what they must try to do. 

3. Tell the rules of the game. 

4. Tell what you like about it. 

LESSON 94 

Describe a game that you play in summer. 

1. What is the game called? 

2. What do you like about it? 

3. How do you play it? 

4. How many can play? 



- \ 



62 



LESSON 95 
For Reading and Talking 




BABY LAND 

How many miles to Baby Land? 
Any one can tell; 

Up one flight, 

To your right; 
Please to ring the bell. 

What can you see in Baby Land? 
Little folks in white, 

Downy heads. 

Cradle beds. 
Faces pure and bright. 



LESSON 95— Continued 63 

What do they do in Baby Land? 
Dream and wake and play, 

Laugh and crow, 

Shout and grow; 
Jolly times have they. 

What do they say in Baby Land? 
Why, the oddest things; 

Might as well 

Try to tell 
What a birdie sings. 

Who is the queen of Baby Land? 
Mother, kind and sweet; 

And her love. 

Born above. 
Guides the little feet. 




64 



LESSON 96 



Copy all the words in Lesson 95 that rhyme, 

like this : 

tell flight 

bell right 

LESSON 97 
For Writing 

Put these words into sentences of your own. 
You will find them all in Lesson 95. 



please flight folks 
jolly shout queen 



pure dream 
love guides 



LESSON 98 



Tell in writing liow you would take care of a 
little brother or sister. 




LESSON 99 
For Talking or Writing 



65 




This is a Japanese lady taking a ride in her 
carriage, which she calls a jinrikisha. Tell all 
you can 

1. About the carriage. 

2. About the lady. 

3. About the man who draws the carriage. 



66 LESSON 100 

Learn the names of these marks, which are used 
in writing. You have copied them many times. 

1. The period (.). 

2. The comma (,). 

3. The question mark (?). 

When you copy a piece of writing, copy the 
marks as well as the words. 



1. Find ten periods in your reading book. 

2. Find five commas. 

3. Find two question marks. 

4. Copy two questions from your read- 
ing book. 

LESSON 101 

Write six questions about the orange and 
answer them yourself. Put a question mark at 
the end of every question and a period at the 
end of every answer. 



LESSON 102 
For Talking 



67 



Tell how you would 
make a kite like this 
out of paper or cloth. 
Make one, if you can. 




LESSON 103 



Draw the picture of the kite and write a 
story about it. 



LESSON 104 



Tell how you would build a fence around your 
garden if you had one. 

Draw a picture of your fence, and show how 
it would look. 



68 



LESSON 105 




NOW THE SUN IS SINKING 

JSiAydA' a/ivci ^?e€4- a/tvcL cAildAAyyv 
CM A^^ixiMy OA^rUy to- i^aZ: 

6(a^ iZ ^d4ynAy a£o-ru2y, 

Copy the verse. 



LESSON 106 69 

Draw a picture to illustrate one of these 
sentences : 

1. By the side of the little cottage grows 
a tall poplar tree. 

2. Hiawatha sat at the door of his wig- 
wam under the trees. 

3. Baby John has put on his father's hat. 

4. A little boat is sailing on the sea. 

5. The little boy is carrying a heavy 
basket. 

LESSON 107 




What is a wheelbarrow good for? 
Draw the picture and tell what you would do 
with the wheelbarrow if it were yours. 




70 



LESSON 108 71 

For Writing 

Tell everything that you see in the picture on 
page 70. Let every pupil try to see the most and 
to tell it in the best way. 

LESSON 109 
For Talking 

1. What is a sheepfold? 

2. Is this sheepfold out of doors or under 
a roof ? 

3. What is the use of the rack against 
the wall? 

4. If you were a sheep, what would you 
like to have in the sheepfold ? 

5. What kind of shepherd would you like ? 

6. What kind of pasture would you enjoy? 

7. Tell all that you can about sheep. 

8. How large are they ? 

9. What is their covering? 
10. What is the wool used for? 



72 LESSON 110 

THE DANDELION 

This story was written by a boy in the third 
grade. His name is Joseph. 

May 23, 1906. 
Down in a grassy meadow a little dan- 
delion grew. It had many comrades. Its 
friends were the sun and the dew. When 
the blazing sun was out the little dandelion 
said, " I hope I may be a little sun some day.'' 



1. Write about the dandelion. Tell where 
it grows and how it looks. 

2. Draw a picture of the dandelion leaf. 




LESSON 111 73 

For Copying and Dictation 

One and one are two. 

A bird has two feet. 

Anna is two years old. 

Twenty is ten times two. 

There are two sides to everything. 

It takes two to make a quarrel. 

A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. 

Twice means two times. 

LESSON 112 
For Copying and Dictation 

You are too noisy at your play. 

The load is too heavy for the horse. 

The fox is too crafty to be caught. 

The work is too hard for me to do alone. 

Do not sing too loud. 

James was too late to catch the train. 

I am too busy to play with you. 

Too many cooks spoil the broth. 



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74 



LESSON 113 75 

For Talking and Writing 

The picture on the opposite page shows you a 
girls' school in a country across the ocean. Does 
it seem like your schoolroom ? 

Write all that you see in the picture and tell 
what you like in it. 

LESSON 114 

Tell in writing what you do in school from 
morning till night. 

LESSON 115 
For Copying 

jJlru^y Oy 6y(>ruiy ol 6yeMAyO-nAy! 

fJlo^uMAA^ oru tAey {^uyyriyyriy^Ay, 
3iA^tA^ Iriy tfiAy laM. 

From "Poems and Ballads." Copyright, 1895, 1896, 
by Charles Scribner's Sons. 



76 



LESSON 116 
For Talking 




Learning to Walk 



MUlet 



1. Who painted the picture from which 
this is copied? 

2. What is the picture about? 

3. Tell what you see in the picture. 

4. Tell what you like in it. 

Try to tell it so plainly that one who had 
never seen the picture would know from your 
telling what it is like. 



LESSON 117 77 

For Writing 
Have you ever watched a child who was learn- 
ing to walk? Tell what he did and how he 
learned. 

LESSON 118 
For Copying and Dictation 
Give me two strings to tie my two shoes. 
That church has two spires. 
Carry two apples to Mary. 
To promise and to perform are two differ- 
ent things. 

Two boats came sailing back to town. 

LESSON 119 
For Copying and Dictation 
Dan likes to play ball. 
Mary went to the city yesterday. 
It is easy for May to be good. 
I rode from Boston to New York. 
Do unto others as you would that they should 
do to you. 



78 



LESSON 120 
For Reading and Writing 




Here is a picture of a lighthouse. It is built 
upon the rocks. The water often covers the 
rocks so that you cannot see them, but that 
makes them all the more dangerous. 

The lighthouse is built to warn the sailors 
to keep away from the hidden rocks, which 
might break their ship in pieces. 

Men live in the house which you see near the 
lighthouse. Every day they trim the lamps and 
polish the windows. At sunset the light from the 
lamp flashes its friendly warning far out to sea. 



LESSON 121 



79 




Draw a picture of this lighthouse. 



LESSON 122 

Answer in written sentences : 

What animal is larger than a frog? 
What animal is smaller than a frog? 
What is harder than wood? 
What is softer than wood? 
What is heavier than cotton? 
What is lighter than iron? 



80 



LESSON 123 
For Reading and Writing 




THE COUNTRY LAD AND THE RIVER 

A country lad with honest air 

Stood by the riverside; 
He put his basket calmly down, 

And gazed upon the tide. 

Across the river's rapid flood 
He saw the village well; 

Twas there he meant to see his aunt, 
And there his turnips sell. 



LESSON 123 — Continued 81 

The stream was full with recent rain, 

And flowed so swiftly by, 
He thought he would with patience wait, 

And soon it would be dry. 

For many hours he waited there, 
But still the stream flowed on; 

And when he sadly turned away. 
The summer day was gone. 

His turnips might have gone to seed. 
His aunt have pined away, 

For still the stream kept flowing on. 
Nor has it stopped to-day. 

Tell the story in writing in your own words. 
See how short you can make the story, and yet 
tell it all. 

LESSON 124 

Spell the ten hardest words in Lesson 123. 



82 



LESSON 125 
For Reading and Talking 




Where do people get water to drink? 

Lucy Lakin lives in a valley near high hills. 
The clear cold water from the hills runs through 
a pipe to Lucy's house. Her cousin lives on the 
mountain. She dips her cup into the spring itself, 
in the shadow of the forest, when she wishes to 
drink. 

Henry Hunt lives by a large lake. He drinks 
the water of the lake. His brother works in the 



LESSON 125 — Continued 83 

city, twenty miles away. The water from the 
same lake is carried through large iron pipes 
to the city. There it runs into the city houses 
through smaller pipes. Henry dips the water 
from the lake. His brother turns a faucet and 
the lake water runs to him from miles away. 

John James lives on a farm. He drinks water 
from a well which his father dug and lined with 
stones. In some places the well is simply a long 
pipe driven into the earth until it finds water. 

In some dry desert places no water can be 
found. Then it is carried miles in cans or cases, 
for the thirsty people to drink. Water seems very 
precious in the desert lands where no rain falls 
for months at a time. 

LESSON 126 

Bead Lesson 125 carefully; then write all the 
ways in which people get water to drink. Write 
it in your own way and do not try to copy the 
lesson. 



84 LESSON 127 

TRUTH 

Boy, at all times tell the truth; 

Let no lie defile thy mouth. 
If thou 'rt wrong, be still the same — 

Speak the truth and bear the blame. 

Truth is honest, truth is sure; 

Truth is strong and must endure; 
Falsehood lasts a single day, 

Then it vanishes away. 

Boy, at all times tell the truth, 

Let no lie defile thy mouth; 
Truth is steadfast, sure, and fast — 

Certain to prevail at last. 

Copy the ten hardest words in the poem. 

LESSON 128 

Copy the poem in Lesson 127 and learn it 
by heart. 



LESSON 129 85 

For Talking and Writing 

Name two things which are heavy ; small ; 
large; slender; narrow; strong; valuable; hard; 
soft; common. 

Your sentences should be something like this : 
Iron and lead are heavy. 
Gold and diamonds are valuable. 

LESSON 130 
For Writing 

1. What can a boy do to help at home? 

2. What can a girl do? 

3. Tell something that you have done to 
help at home. 

LESSON 131 

Ask ten questions about your schoolhouse and 
be ready to read them to the class, to be answered 
by the other pupils. 

Write plainly, so that you may exchange papers. 

Use the question mark (?) after every question. 




Jack is Writing his Letter 



80 



LESSON 132 



87 



Uncle Frank gave Jack a knife, and Jack wrote 
a note to thank him for it. This is his note : 

jSUyOAy IJyivcXo 3u:inA, 

Oy ^^rviXe^ loA^ cu io^ruoy wJiyllo. J? 
rueytycL onnAy ivJi/eyyv J? ax)- iiAAdyrhOy. 



ryiAy. 



1Jxm4A^ ^yax>^. 



Copy Jack's note. 





88 LESSON 133 

For Reading and Talking 

My name is Mary 
Blair. I live in Plym- 
outh, Massachusetts- 
Yesterday I had a let- 
ter from my Aunt 
Anna, who lives in 
Boston. On the en- 
velope was written 

??U6y6^ THyOAynJy J3ia4Ay 

This is the first letter that ever came to me 
through the post office. I am only eight years old. 

Now I must write a letter to Aunt Anna. She 
has asked me to go to Boston to see her, and 
mother says I may go. I cannot write very 
well, but mother will help me. Would you like 
to see Aunt Anna's letter ? Here it is. 



LESSON 134 89 

nAyO^Uy iik^ to- oo-rrvo? 

nAyOMy myci/w oom/ey n^yzZ JhuAA- 

dyOynJy to- 6ZaynAy Oy UMytA. J? uUM 

nnytytZ njAHJy at thAy (U^ztU>my, tl 
nAyO-w uUM ttM ryvey u^A^yTiy to- 

iJyOuAy lo-nMyyvoy 

OyiAynt CLmyriMy. 

Copy the letter. 



90 LESSON 135 

MARY'S LETTER TO HER AUNT ANNA 

(Ziyu^. 2:1, jqos. 

ll'Ou/u leyVU/u caynvey tA4Ay ryoo^i/yv- 

OyO to I3o^Uo-ny ove^^ J AuAAycLayw. 

tfuyuo, curvdy A^ iA^Xl toAe^ mo 
o-my th^ riinvey o-'clo-cA tuiyimy. 

J? oa/tv A/oAxiJ^ uHiitloA^ JnuAA^- 
lJx>uAy ionM/ruoy ruAx^ey, 

Copy the letter. 



LESSON 136 



91 



Here is a picture of the envelope in which Mary 
sent her letter. Copy it 






LESSON 137 

Cut or fold five i^ieces of paper to look like 
envelopes. Write on them the names of chil- 
dren in school, with the name of your town and 
state, as if you were addressing a letter. Use 
Mary's envelope as a pattern. 



92 LESSON 138 

For Talking 

1. Name five things which are heavy. 

2. Name two things which are brown, 

3. Name three things which are large. 

4. Name two things which are sweet. 

5. Name two things which are sour. 

6. Name something which is brittle. 

7. Name something which is tough. 

Make a sentence for each answer. 

LESSON 139 
For Talking 
Fill the blanks which you find in these sentences. 

1. Coal is black, but salt is . 

2. Vinegar is sour, but molasses is . 



3. May's ribbon is broad, but Kate's is- 

4. Tom is tall, but James is . 

5. The stone is hard, but the pillow is - 

6. The table is smooth, but the road is - 

7. This stick is crooked, but the rule is - 



LESSON 140 



93 



Bead these questions, and think how you will 
answer them. Then write the answers neatly. 

1. Where have you seen robins? 

2. What were they doing? 

3. What do they like to eat? 

4. Where do they build their nests? 

5. How do they build them? 

6. Who feeds the baby robins? 

7. Who teaches them to fly? 



LESSON 141 




Draw the robin and write about it. 



94 



LESSON 142 




SINGING 



6A/nay6y, 

OyTui tfuynnyo^ 



LESSON ±4:2— Continued 95 

JA^ <>AyiZ(iAyeyriy 6yiru2^ Iro 
nroayny 

From "Poems and Ballads.'' Copyright, 1896, 1896, 
by Charles Scribner's Sons. 

These verses were written by Robert Louis 
Stevenson, who loved to write verses for chil- 
dren. Perhaps you know other verses which he 
has written. 

Copy the poem. 

LESSON 143 

What sounds did you hear at recess or before 
school this morning? 

Answer in written sentences. 



i 



96 LESSON 144 

John has a bar of iron and a bar of soap, 

1. Which is heavier ? 

2. Which is lighter? 

3. Which is softer? 

4. Which is harder ? 

5. What is the iron good for ? 

6. What is the soap good for ? 

LESSON 145 

Name ten things which are made of iron. 
Tell why the iron is used in each article* 

LESSON 146 

Lulu Bell is nine years old. She is in the third 
grade in the schools of Rockaway, Ohio. Last 
week she fell and was badly hurt, so that she 
cannot return to school for many weeks. 

Write a letter to Lulu and tell her what you 
would like to hear if you were in her place. 
Do not forget to say that her playmates miss hen 



LESSON 147 97 

IjJo d^^ i^^ tAe^ li/iAtAy'^ oa^- 

tiycUy; 
JA^ £/i}-eynnyirua' wiAAt oa/}ruo ^U^- 

Q-nnAy S^ o-riAy Iro th^ ii/oAt- 

JA^ la/mfi^ dXo-TT^ out o-Tb 
hloA, 

Copy the verse. 

Draw a picture of something which the verse 
makes you think of. 



98 



LESSON 148 
For Reading and Telling 




Aunt Mary leaned over the gate and called to 
little Mary. It was October, and the brown leaves 
were lying in heaps under the trees. ^*Come, 
May," she said, '' and see what I have in- my 
hand.'' 

May hastened to look. Aunt Mary's hands 
were filled with little brown balls, May thought. 
''Are they marbles?" she said. Aunt Mary 
laughed. '' No ; they are bulbs. You cannot guess 
what is in them. Take them home and plant 
them in the grass on the south side of the house. 



LESSON 148— Continued 99 

They will be hidden under the snow all winter. In 
the spring they will have something to show you." 

May took the bulbs in her apron and ran home 
to her mother. Together they planted the little 
brown things under the grass on the south side 
of the house. 

Then came November, December, January, 
February, — long, cold months, with short days, 
long nights, bitter winds, and high-heaped snow- 
drifts. But with March came the spring sunshine, 
and the snow melted and hurried away. 

It had hardly gone — in the shade of the house 
it was still heaped high — when the tiny snow- 
drops lifted their heads from the frozen ground 
_ where May had planted the bulbs. Tender and 
fair as a baby's hand, and white as the new-fallen 
snow, the brave little blossoms came with the 
first breath of spring. 

"How could they do it?'' cried May. Who is 
wise enough to tell? 



100 



LESSON 149 




Draw the jonquil, and de- 
scribe it. 

Tell about the bulb, the 
leaves, and the blossom. 

Do you know any plant 
that grows from a bulb? 

If you do, write about that 
plant too. 

Perhaps you will plant a 
bulb, and see the leaves 
grow. 



LESSON 150 

SNOWDROPS 

Here are snowdrops like those which May 
planted. Tell all that you can about them. 




LESSON 151 101 

THE VIOLET 

Down in a green and shady bed 

A modest violet grew; 
Its stalk was bent, it hung its head, 

As if to hide from view. 

And yet it was a lovely flower, 

Its color bright and fair; 
It might have graced a rosy bower. 

Instead of hiding there. 

Yet there it was content to bloom. 

In modest tints arrayed. 
And there it spreads its sweet perfume 

Within the silent shade. 

Then let me to the valley go. 

This pretty flower to see, 
That I may also learn to grow 

In sweet humility. 

Study the poem, so that you can read it in 
the class. 



102 



LESSON 152 



Choose five hard words from " The Violet," on 
page 101, and put them in five good sentences. 
Select the words which you do not often use, and 
try to learn how to use them. 

LESSON 153 

What words might you use instead of stalk? 
lovely? bloom? silent? perfume? shade? view? 

LESSON 154 




Draw this cup and saucer, and make up a story 
about them. 



LESSON 155 103 

For Writing 




Changing Pasture 



Bosa Bonheur 



Here are some Scottish shepherds taking their 
sheep in the big, wide boat across the lake from 
one pasture to another. How strong the boatmen 
are! How kind and careful the old shepherd 
seems. 

1. What do you see in the picture ? 

2. What can you tell about the country ? 

3. Describe the boat. 

4. Tell what you can of the shepherds. 

5. Describe the sheep. 



104 LESSON 156 

For Reading 




THE LITTLE BOY AND THE SHEEP 

Lazy sheep, pray tell me why 
In the pleasant field you lie, 
Eating grass and daisies white 
From the morning till the night; 
Everything can something do. 
But what kind of use are you? 

Nay, my little master, nay; 
Do not serve me so, I pray; 
Don't you see the wool that grows 
On my back to make your clothes? 



LESSON ±56— Continued 105 

Cold, ah, very cold you 'd be. 
If you had not wool from me. 

True, it seems a pleasant thing 
Nipping daisies in the spring, 
But what chilly nights I pass 
On the cold and dewy grass, 
Or pick my scanty dinner where 
All the ground is brown and bare! 

Then the farmer comes at last, 
When the merry spring is past. 
Cuts my woolly fleece away 
For your coat in wintry day. 
Little master, this is why 
In the pleasant fields I lie. 

LESSON 157 

Copy from Lesson 156 the words that describe 

1. The daisies. 4. The fields. 7. The nights. 

2. The fleece. 5. The spring. 8. The grass. 

3. The day. 6. The dinner. 9. The master. 



106 LESSON 158 

For Reading and Talking 

Here is a long language lesson written by a 
boy in the third grade. It is in two parts. In 
the first part he plays that he is a fish and wishes 
he could be a boy. In the second part he plays 
that he wants to be a fish. 

PART I 

I am no longer a boy. I am a fish. 

I live in the salt water. I like to live there. 
I have water as much as I want. I have so much 
fun with my friends. I have thousands of friends. 

I 'd rather be a boy than a fish. The boys can 
climb trees, and I can't. The boys could play ball 
and climb fences, and I can't. The boys can eat 
apples and oranges, and I eat worms. They see 
the pretty flowers and see the trees. I only see 
my friends the fishes. That 's all I could see, but 
I am very happy with my friends. Bears like me. 
They catch me in the north. I see seals there. 



LESSON 158 — Continued 107 

PART II 

I am no longer a little fish. I am a boy. My 
name is Edwai-d French. 

I wear a brown suit. I have green trousers. I 
have hands. I have a face. I have two fine pair 
of horses. They run very fast. They are my feet. 
I do not need any real horses. 

I 'd rather be a fish because I 'd have a playful 
time with my friends. We duck ourselves. We 
see great steamboats. We think that we may have 
to lose our lives. 

See if you can correct some of the mistakes in 
Edward's lesson. 

LESSON 159 

Play that you are a bird and would like to be 
a boy or girl. 

LESSON 160 

Play that you would like to be a bird, and 
tell why. 



108 LESSON 161 

For Talking and Writing 




If you live in Florida or in California, you have 
seen trees like these. If you live in Maine or in 
Ohio, they will seem very strange to you. 

Palm trees grow only in warm countries. They 
could not live through the winter in a land of 
snow and ice. You will travel north to see pine 
trees, and south to see palm trees. 

Draw a picture of a palm tree, and a picture 
of the tree you know best. Tell in what ways 
they are different. 



LESSON 162 



109 




These pine trees grew in New Hampshire. Per- 
haps such trees grow near your home. 
Write all you can about the pine tree. 

1. What are the leaves of the pine 
tree called? 

2. What is the shape of the leaves? 

3. What do you know about the bark 
of the pine tree? 

4. What is its fruit? 

5. What do you know of its wood? 

(If you do not know pine trees, write about 
some other tree.) 



110 



LESSON 163 



Tell the diflferences between the apple tree or 
the birch tree and the pine tree. 



LESSON 164 



Name all the trees you know, and tell some- 
thing about each tree. 



LESSON 165 




LoMBARDY Poplars 



Draw these trees, and write about them. 



LESSON 166 111 

WHAT THE SPARROW CHIRPS 

I am only a little sparrow, 

A bird of low degree; 
My life is of little value, 

But the dear Lord cares for me. 

I fly through the thickest forests, 

I light on many a spray; 
I have no chart or compass, 

But I never lose my way. 

And I fold my wings at twilight. 

Wherever I happen to be; 
For the Father is always watching. 

And no harm will come to me. 

Learn the poem by heart. 

LESSON 167 

Tell a stranger just how he could find his way 
to your schoolhouse from the railway station. 



112 LESSON 168 

Copy this verse, and learn it by heart : 

it d^. 

jJo S^t<Ml^ it €yaAt OA^ S^to^VU- it 
iAMAZ, 

JA^ UH/wdy tAat Uo-uMiy, tAat 

iApimyCL i^ S-tAt. 

LESSON 169 
For Writing 

What are the names of the winds? Where 
does the north wind come from? the east? the 
south? the west? Which is the warm wind? 
Which wind brings the rain? What work does 
the wind do? What harm may it do? 



LESSON 170 



113 



In old days com 
was ground by a 
windmill. Here is 
a picture of one. 
The great arms 
move around when 
the wind blows. 
Draw the picture. 




-^s 



LESSON 171 

Use each of these words in a sentence. After- 
wards you may read the sentences in the class, 
and ask others to spell the words. 

hear be see by sale 

here bee sea buy sail 

LESSON 172 

Learn to spell these words and to use them in 
sentences. 

some sun beet two I 
sum son beat too eye 



114 



LESSON 173 
For Reading and Talking 




TWO PICTURES 
An old farmhouse, with meadows wide, 
And sweet with clover on each side; 
A bright-eyed boy, who looks from out 
The door, with woodbine wreathed about, 
And wishes his one thought all day: 
'' Oh, if I could but fly away 

From this dull spot, the world to see, 
How happy, happy, happy, 

How happy I should be ! '' 



LESSON ±73 — Continued 115 

Amid the city's constant din, 
A man who round the world has been, 
Who, 'mid the tumult and the throng, 
Is thinking, thinking all day long, 
"Oh, could I only tread once more 
The field-path to the farmhouse door. 

The old green meadows could I see. 
How happy, happy, happy. 

How happy I should be ! " 

This poem shows you two pictures, but they 
are not painted pictures. The words are meant 
to make you think the pictures. 

What do you see in the first picture? What 
is the boy in the picture saying? 

The man in the second picture is the boy of 
the first picture. Tell what you see in the second 
picture. What is the man saying? 

LESSON 174 

Draw the farmhouse, and write about it. 



116 



LESSON 175 



For Reading and Talking 



m^wJELm. 



Do you like to travel? Would you like to 
take a journey with a water drop? 

Now it is riding in the dark cloud which you 
see far up in the sky. 

Now it comes tumbling down, down, down, into 
the heart of the woods. It falls on the tree top and 
drips down the leaves to the green moss below. 

Now it hides away in the ground beneath and 
creeps along until it finds the hurrying brook. 

Now it dances along with its comrades in the 
brook over pebbles and rocks, past fields and 
meadows, until it finds the river. 



LESSON riB— Continued 117 

Now it is swept along in the broad, strong river 
until it finds the sea. 

Will it rest in the sea ? No ; once again it goes 
forth. This time it is lifted high in the air until 
it reaches the cloud again. You can see the rain- 
drop falling, but you cannot see it rise from the 
sea to the cloud. 

LESSON 176 

Write these sentences, and fill the blank spaces 
with the words which you think belong in them. 

Sugar is sweet, but vinegar is . 

Iron is heavy, but cotton is . 

A horse is large, but a mouse is . 

A plank is thick, but a card is . 

A stone is hard, but is . 

The telegraph pole is tall, but the gate- 
post is . 

This fruit is good, but that is . 

Mary is merry, but Kate is . 



118 LESSON 177 

For Talking and Writing 

Children often write in short, stiff sentences 
when they are learning to write. But you are 
now wise enough to use the longer sentence, as 
older people do. 

A book is under the table. 

I want that book. 

These two sentences are correct, but they do 
not sound well. They seem stiff and abrupt. 
This is better: 

I want the book which is under the table. 

Think how these sentences sound: 

1. James ran all the way to school. 

He was afraid that he would be late. 

2. James ran all the way to school because 
he was afraid that he would be late. 

Which do you like? 

Make another sentence, using ** because '' in it 



LESSON m — Continued 119 

Observe these sentences : 

1. Oranges grow in California. 
Apricots grow there too. 

2. Oranges and apricots grow in California. 

The one longer sentence is smoother and better 
than the two short ones, for the thoughts belong 
together. 

LESSON 178 
For Talking or Writing 

Put these sentences together in any way that 
seems to you good. 

1. Simple Simon met a pieman. 

The pieman was going to the fair. 

2. The ship sails into the harbor. 
The harbor is under the hill. 

3. The fire bell sounded its alarm. 

The fire horses rushed down the street. 

4. The bucket was old. 

It was made of oak. J 

It hung in the well. 



120 LESSON 179 

For Reading and Talking 

THE MILLER OF THE DEE 

There dwelt a miller, hale and bold, 

Beside the river Dee; 
He worked and sang from morn till night, 

No lark more blithe than he ; 
And this the burden of his song 

Forever used to be: 
** I envy nobody, no, not I, 

And nobody envies me." 

**Thou 'rt wrong, my friend," said good 
King Hal, — 

''As wrong as wrong can be, — 
For could my heart be light as thine, 

I'd gladly change with thee; 
And tell me now, what makes thee sing. 

With voice so loud and free. 
While I am sad, though I 'm the king. 

Beside the river Dee." 



LESSON ±79 — Continued 121 

The miller smiled and doffed his cap: 

**I earn my bread," quoth he; 
**I love my wife, I love my friend, 

I love my children three; 
I owe no penny I cannot pay; 

I thank the river Dee, 
That turns the mill that grinds the corn 

That feeds my babes and me.'' 

'* Good friend," said Hal, and sighed the while, 

** Farewell, and happy be; 
But say no more, if thou 'dst be true. 

That no one envies thee: 
Thy mealy cap is worth my crown. 

Thy mill, my kingdom's fee ; 
Such men as thou are England's boast, 

miller of the Dee ! " 




122 LESSON 180 

For Talking 

Eead '* The Miller of the Dee." 

Where did this miller live? What kind of a 
miller was he? What did he do from morning 
until night ? What was his song ? Who came to 
talk with the miller? What did he say? Why 
did the king envy the miller? How did the 
miller answer the king? 

Which was happier, the king or the miller? 
What does the king have that the miller cannot 
have? What can the miller do that the king 
cannot do? 

See if you can play *' The Miller of the Dee." 
Let somebody be the miller and somebody be 
the king. 

LESSON 181 

See if you can tell the story of '' The Miller of 
the Dee." Use these words in sentences: 

envy boast kingdom bold 

lark doffed sighed dwelt 




LESSON 182 123 

Anna Burns sent a 
primrose plant to Ruth 
Eliot. Anna likes prim- 
roses, and she thought 
Ruth would enjoy watch- tg^* 
ing the opening blossoms 
and that she would like 
to take care of the plant and make it grow. 
Would you not like such a gift? 

Write the note which you think Anna sent with 
the primrose. 

LESSON 183 

Write the note which Ruth sent to Anna thank- 
ing her for the primrose. 

LESSON 184 

Play that you are very rich, and that you are 
sending a pony and cart to a little lame boy so 
that he may ride every day. Write the letter 
which you will send to the little boy. 



I 



124 LESSON 185 

I know a school where the children like to use 
new words. They say that learning a new word 
is like finding a new flower, or having a new toy 
to play with. One of the children wrote this les- 
son. He was learning to use the word ** merrily": 

May 3, 1906. 
The wind is playing merrily. He is waving 
the branches and the little grasses. 

Would you like to learn new words ? Here are 
some for you to use in sentences: 

lovely sturdy 

earnest innocent 

excited modest 

delicate arrayed 

LESSON 186 

Find ten hard words in your reading book. 
Copy them and bring to the class to be used in 
sentences. 



LESSON 187 
For Talking and Writing 



125 




This is a picture of a cottage in England. It is 
not like the houses which we see every day. 
Study the picture, then tell all that you see in it. 



LESSON 188 

Write about the house you live in. 

1. Where is it, and what is it made of? 

2. How many rooms has it? 

3. What more can you tell about it ? 



126 



LESSON 189 
To Learn by Heart 




THE LAND OF STORY BOOKS 

At evening when the lamp is lit, 
Around the fire my parents sit; 
They sit at home and talk and sing, 
And do not play^ at anything. 

Now, with my little gun, I crawl 
All in the dark along the wall 
And follow round the forest track 
Away behind the sofa back. 



'L'ESSON ±39— Continued 127 

There in the night, where none can spy, 
All in my hunter's camp I lie, 
And play at books that I have read, 
Till it is time to go to bed. 

These are the hills, these are the woods, 
These are my starry solitudes; 
And there the river by whose brink 
The roaring lions come to drink. 

So, when my nurse comes in for me, 
Home I return across the sea, 
And go to bed with backward looks 
At my dear land of story books. 

From "Poems and Ballads." Copyright, 1896, 1896, 
by Charles Scribner's Sons. 




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